Bumper crop for typhoon relief

09 December 2013

AMRC engineers and staff contributed almost £1500 to help typhoon victims in the Philippines, with administrative coordinator Lexie Wattam shaving her head for charity.

Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines and other areas in Southeast Asia in early November, and was the strongest storm ever recorded at landfall. As the scale of the devastation became apparent, Lexie declared she would shave off her hair to help raise money for the Disasters Emergency Committee.

Thanks to AMRC colleagues and friends, donations soon topped her initial target of £500. Including gift aid tax relief, Lexie raised a total of £1418.

"I am truly amazed by the kind generosity and support I have received," says Lexie. "Thank you so much for supporting such a wonderful cause."

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Typhoon Haiyan is estimated to have killed around 6,000 people in the Philippines and affected around 11 million across the region. Almost two million people have been left homeless and six million displaced. Studies of previous storms in the Philippines show that around 15 times as many people die in the year after a storm because of its effects than during the storm itself.

The typhoon was particularly strong because it gained energy from unusually warm deep water in the western Pacific.

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